Underlying Borders
Mar
14
to May 29

Underlying Borders

The Mexican Cultural Center in Washington, DC | On view March 14, 2019-May 29, 2019

The Mexican Cultural Center presents, Underlying Borders, an exhibition that bring together the work of five artist with an experience of migration between Mexico and the United States, who, from their own experience as migrants, work from perspectives that seek to blur and interweave elements through and across borders, drawing not the tension that exists in between places. 

The participating artist explore concepts related to identity, culture, and nationality through a variety of approaches and processes. Their work is a manifestation of their own experience within these transition zones. They challenge us to consider, from distinct points of view, how we think of memory, the body, stereotypes, and implicit violence in our intertwined countries. 

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Solo show at Fortnight Institute
May
1
to Jun 3

Solo show at Fortnight Institute

Fortnight Institute, New York NY | On view May 1, 2019-June 3, 2019

Fortnight Institute is pleased to present La Emergencia de Hacer Memoria, an exhibition of new works on panel by the artist Felipe Baeza. This marks Baeza’s first solo exhibition in New York, as well as the release of his first artist’s book, Gente del Occidente de Mexico published by Fortnight Institute in a limited edition.

Link to press release below

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NXTHVN Studio Fellowship Recipient
Jan
1
7:00 PM19:00

NXTHVN Studio Fellowship Recipient

NXTHVN, New Haven, CT | January 2019-August 2019

NXTHVN announces inaugural studio fellows: Felipe Baeza, Jaclyn Conley, Kenturah davis, Merik Goma, Christie Neptune, Alexandria Smith, and Vaughn Spann.

The NXTHVN's Fellowship program bring together a diverse cohort of emerging studio-based artists and curators to develop and professionalize their practice within New Haven’s creative community.

Located in the Dixwell neighborhood of New Haven, Connecticut, NXTHVN has designed a unique shared environment where artists and curators converge for an opportunity to make art, exchange ideas, and extend their networks. Our comprehensive year-long fellowships provide a stipend, dedicated work space, a professional development curriculum, and several mentorship opportunities with high school students to ensure the next generation of local talent is given a chance to excel in the fine arts.

Founded by artists Titus Kaphar and Jonathan Brand in 2015, NXTHVN, currently in development, is an ambitious art space housed in a former manufacturing plant in the Dixwell neighborhood of New Haven, Connecticut. Our mission is to cultivate a sustainable creative community that attracts and supports talent within and beyond New Haven. The NXTHVN team, with Deborah Berke Partners has designed a unique shared environment where artists and curators converge for an opportunity to make art, exchange ideas, and extend their networks. Our comprehensive fellowships provide dedicated work space, a stipend, a professional development curriculum, and mentorship opportunities. We combine these resources with a paid high school Apprenticeship program to ensure the next generation of talent receives the support and direction it needs. Immersed in the area’s rich intersection of art, academia and history, NXTHVN’s exhibition space, black box theater, and co-working space further create an atmosphere of collaboration, inclusion and social engagement.

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Joan Mitchell Foundation Painters and Sculptors Recipient
Dec
12
6:30 PM18:30

Joan Mitchell Foundation Painters and Sculptors Recipient

Joan Mitchell Foundation, New York, NY | December 12, 2018

The Joan Mitchell Foundation is pleased to announce the 2018 recipients of our annual Painters & Sculptors Grants, which provide 25 artists with $25,000 each in unrestricted funds.

The unrestricted nature of the grants aligns with artist Joan Mitchell’s recognition that having the time and freedom to create is as important to the development of one’s practice as support for specific endeavors. As such, the Foundation, whose mission was set forth in Mitchell’s will, remains committed to providing artists with the flexibility to determine how best to use the grants to advance their careers. In addition to the financial support, recipients of the Painters & Sculptors Grants become eligible to apply for residencies at the Joan Mitchell Center in New Orleans and gain access to a network of arts professionals, who can provide consultations on career development and financial management.

To be eligible for a grant, artists are nominated by artist peers and arts professionals selected from throughout the US, and are then chosen through an anonymous multi-phase jurying process. Over the last several years, the Foundation has increased its attention to equity and access in the selection process, expanding the pool of nominators and jurors to include more geographic, ethnic, and experiential diversity and ensure that the nominees reflect a spectrum of backgrounds and approaches to their work. Among this year’s class of Painters & Sculptors grantees, more than 70% of the grantees identify as female and approximately 80% as non-white, with those identifying as Black, African, African-American, and Caribbean comprising 36% of that number and Hispanic, Latinx, and Chicanx individuals 20%. The artists also range in age from 28 to 59 and hail from 10 states across the US.

The grant recipients' work represents a wide range of artistic techniques, approaches, and concerns, and engages with such pressing issues as migration, identity, notions of belonging, and representation within the art historical canon and in social and political spheres, among other important subjects. The final selections for the grants are made with a particular eye toward artists whose work has contributed to important artistic and cultural discourse, but who have nonetheless remained under-recognized on a national level.

“Joan Mitchell recognized the essential need to support artists in the process of creating. We at the Foundation hear regularly from artists, at all career stages, that many of the challenges they face stem from a lack of support structures for visual artists, and a belief that support for art can be separated from support for artists. We remain dedicated to providing unrestricted funding through our Painters & Sculptors Grants, as a way to acknowledge that each artist knows what is best for them and what will best serve the next phase of their practice,” said Christa Blatchford, CEO of the Joan Mitchell Foundation. “We are delighted to announce and welcome our 2018 recipients. Their work is exciting and compelling, and certainly deserving of greater recognition.”

The recipients are: 

Felipe Baeza, Brooklyn, NY
Cindy Cheng, Baltimore, MD
Yanira Collado, North Miami, FL
Elisabeth Condon, New York, NY
David Antonio Cruz, Brooklyn, NY
Elliot Doughtie, Baltimore, MD
Addoley Dzegede, Portland, OR
Krista Franklin, Chicago, IL
Doreen Garner, Brooklyn, NY
EJ Hill, Los Angeles, CA
Lisa Jarrett, Portland, OR
Elizabeth Malaska, Portland, OR
Joiri Minaya, Bronx, NY
Maia Cruz Palileo, Brooklyn, NY
Wendy Red Star, Portland, OR
Naomi Reis, Brooklyn, NY
Jamea Richmond-Edwards, Silver Spring, MD
Kenny Rivero, New York, NY
Lauren Roche, Minneapolis, MN
Evelyn Rydz, Boston, MA
Blair Saxon-Hill, Portland, OR
Nyugen E. Smith, Jersey City, NJ
Juana Valdes, Miami, FL and Amherst, MA
Jose Villalobos, San Antonio, TX
Brittney Leeanne Williams, Chicago, IL

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Solo Show at Maureen Paley
Nov
15
to Jan 6

Solo Show at Maureen Paley

Maureen Paley, London, UK | On view November 15, 2018-January 6, 2019

Maureen Paley is pleased to announce the first solo exhibition in the UK by Felipe Baeza. The work presented at the gallery explores ideas surrounding his interest in migration, queerness, and anthropology through the use of both collage and printmaking. The work also derives from a wide spectrum of sources that address concepts of regeneration from Maya mythology to contemporary literary texts by Edwidge Danticat and Gloria Anzaldua.

"... Primarily working on paper and incorporating different techniques via collage and decollage, I aim to render visible those bodies and histories that have been rendered invisible and have disappeared. In making the invisible visible and vice versa I aim to challenge those notions that keep people in the margins. My work is concerned with the body as praxis and the possibilities of creating subjects that seek to reveal their complexities. I also utilise my own biography to reflect on my personal experiences and explore the persistent effects of social institutions and cultural practices on the individual. I use this strategy to imagine structures and possibilities for the self-emancipation of the hybrid-fugitive body that is persistently susceptible to hostile conditions. The possibility of self-emancipation is forged by the necessity to survive and thrive, wherein one is forced to create new forms and structures which produce liminal spaces of belonging. The work exists between a real and imaginary space of life, death, and transformation that lives beyond borders and boundaries; while also offering the viewer a return to places, histories and visions of the past that might otherwise be forgotten.

In these pieces I exploit collage and printmaking elements to show how the body undergoes fragmentation or is pulled apart and dismembered, then reconstructed. This leads to questions I present such as how one honours those who are no longer with us and have disappeared in the process of migrating for a better life. This has been part of a series inspired by Drexciya and Afrofuturist myth. Drexciya was an underwater nation populated by African people and their unborn children who were thrown off of slave ships during the middle passage. Those individuals developed gills in order to survive. My work makes us think about Drexciya as well as the many lives that have perished through forced migration, imagining those individuals still thriving through regeneration and through different forms such as plants.

The use of dark colours in these pieces derives from an interest in darkness and night that functions as an in-between space where transformation happens. "


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The Least Orthodox Goddess IV
Sep
8
to Oct 20

The Least Orthodox Goddess IV

Jenkins Johnson Projects, Brooklyn, NY | On view September 8, 2018-October 20, 2018

Jenkins Johnson Projects is pleased to present The Least Orthodox Goddess IV, a group exhibition featuring works by Felipe Baeza, Darío Calmese, David Antonio Cruz, Delano Dunn, Jonathan Gardenhire, Billy Ray Morgan, Zachary Richardson, and Kiyan Williams. 

The Least Orthodox Goddess IV is part of an ongoing series of exhibitions that originally started as an exploration of intersectional feminism through the lens of womxn power. IV dives into the idea of what constitutes female identity within the contemporary context: it looks at what it means to be a ‘goddess’ outside of the constraints of physiological or socially constructed expectations: what it means to be cis vs trans vs non-binary, what it means to be of color vs black vs white vs brown, what it means to be subjugated and/or be venerated. This exhibition implores us to contend with grey areas within a larger system that is rooted in binary understandings of everything the world has to offer.

Within this framework, many works in the exhibition dives further into the idea of how ‘divinity’ is determined. It urges the viewer to examine the parameters or boundaries of who/what is venerated within the rigid mainstream structure of social acceptability. It strives to highlight persons who have bent, flexed, and subverted the notions of what does or does not define the ‘feminine’ or ‘femme’. Some of the female identified persons who are portrayed in this iteration of LOG have been victims of unimaginable violence (physical, psychological, and cultural) because of their identities- be they gender orientation, sexual orientation, cultural affiliation, and/or racial presentation. The exhibition seeks to honor their strength and sacrifice while exploring the idea or culturally non-specific trope of ‘goddess.’ 

As with other exhibitions in this series, IV, takes a survey approach to the topic of gender empowerment, identity, and violence. It looks at a wide range of examples as an indicator of the pervasiveness of gender and sexual discrimination across identities and cultures, with a particular emphasis on bodies of color. The overarching thread amongst the works is not only to acknowledge a violence; but also, to celebrate those who have been rendered invisible or unimportant by sharing their stories.

Curated by Jasmine Wahi

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Heads/Tails: Yale MFA Painting Show
Sep
7
to Sep 30

Heads/Tails: Yale MFA Painting Show

Next to Nothing, New York, NY | On view September 7-30, 2018

Next to Nothing is pleased to present, Heads/Tails, an exhibition featuring the Yale MFA Painting/Printmaking graduates of 2018.

Artist in Tails group: Kathryn Kerr, Antonia Kuo, Ilana Savdie, Julia Rooney, Clare Kambhu, Ernest Bryant, Estefania Puerta, Felipe Baeza, Lauren Chun, Leslie Martinez, and Camille Altay

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XL Caitlin Art Prize
Aug
22
to Nov 29

XL Caitlin Art Prize

XL Catlin Art Prize, San Francisco, CA, Chicago, IL, & New York, NY | On view August 22, 2018-November 29, 2018

XL Catlin Art Prize announces exhibition shortlist Prestigious student art exhibition to go on US tour: San Francisco, Chicago, New York 40 student artists chosen from over 700 submissions nationwide First prize winner to be chosen in November

XL Catlin is pleased to announce that works from 40 student artists have been selected for the inaugural XL Catlin Art Prize Traveling Exhibition. Launched in December 2017, the XL Catlin Art Prize is devoted to figurative artwork and is one of the premier student art competitions in the United States. The exhibition will go on a nationwide tour beginning at the San Francisco Art Institute from August 22 – October 7, with a public reception to be held on Friday, August 31. It will then travel to Chicago where it will be on view at Linda Warren Projects from November 3 – 8. The tour finishes in New York City at the New York Academy of Art with an exhibition on view from November 21 – 29.

The Prize - The first prize and second prize winners will be announced at the closing reception on Wednesday, November 28. The first prize is $10,000 and second prize is $3,500 and winners will be chosen by renowned artists Nicole Eisenman, Eric Fischl and Amy Sherald, with Jennifer Schipf, Senior Vice President for Fine Art & Specie Insurance at XL Catlin. The exhibition will be accompanied by an illustrated catalogue. In an innovative twist, the Prize also includes an Audience Award, to be selected via Instagram. Beginning on August 12, individual works will be posted to XL Catlin Art Prize’s Instagram account (@xlcatlinartprize) every 48 hours until all have been shown and the work with the most “likes” on the platform will win $1,500. This will be the first prestigious art prize conducted via the social media platform of Instagram.

The Finalists - Over 700 submissions were received from 140 different schools, both undergraduate and graduate programs. The 40 works in the exhibition, which include paintings, drawings, prints, tapestries and other media, were chosen by an Exhibition Jury comprised of Ian Alteveer, Curator for Modern and Contemporary Art at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, Jennie Goldstein, Assistant Curator at the Whitney Museum, Laura Hoptman, Curator at the Museum of Modern Art, and Kara Vander Weg, Director at Gagosian Gallery. @xlcatlinartprize @xlcatlinartprize The shortlisted artists, 20 young men and 20 young women, are enrolled at 24 different schools and range in age from 19 to 27. The artists hail from 4 countries and 19 states. Six schools had two artists make the cut: Hunter College, the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Art, Rhode Island School of Design, San Francisco Art Institute, Savannah College of Art and Design, and the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. Three shortlisted artists are from Yale University, four from the Maryland Institute College of Art, and five from the New York Academy of Art. The focus of the XL Catlin Art Prize reflects the reemergence of figurative art in the contemporary art world and seeks to support the next generation of American artists. Prize Juror Jennifer Schipf of XL Catlin said, “Following ten successful years of holding the competition in the UK, the Prize gives us the perfect platform to highlight new artists and provides a unique insight into emerging talent in the US.”

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Four Artists
Jun
21
to Jul 27

Four Artists

Fredericks & Freiser, New York, NY | On view June 21, 2018-July 25, 2018

Fredericks & Freiser is is pleased to present, 4 Artist, Felipe Baeza, Jenna Gribbon, Anja Salonen, & Vaughn Spann.

‘Felipe Baeza’s large-scale paintings on paper are an oppositional force against historical iconography. As both a queer man and an immigrant, Baeza’s personal narrative influences his depictions of the male body in heightened stages of emotional and physical experience.  From the seemingly mythic representation of a figure floating in space to more lyrical depictions of sexual contact, Baeza magnifies life to heroic proportions.’ Fredericks and Freiser

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 WAY OUT NOW
Jun
16
to Jul 21

WAY OUT NOW

Diane Rosenstein, Los Angeles, CA | On view June 16, 2018-July 21, 2018

Diane Rosenstein Gallery is pleased to present Way Out Now, a group exhibition of Yale’s 2018 MFA Painting and Printmaking graduates. Way Out Now will present twenty-three artists from the United States, Klamath Tribes, Mexico, and Colombia. This exhibition includes paintings, sculpture, ceramics, textiles, works on paper, video, and printed matter.  “Way Out Now” is our gallery’s second show with Yale School of Art MFA artists. Each artist has pursued studies in the category of “Painting” or “Printmaking,” yet they navigated that space in a way that manifested in a variety of forms - often blurring or transforming any distinctions between painting and sculpture, photography, multiples, writing or performance. Several artists appear to prioritize formal investigations, while others articulate their ideas around subjectivity (gender identity, race, personal histories) through form.  

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The New Contemporaries Vol. 1 - Group Show
Jun
16
to Aug 25

The New Contemporaries Vol. 1 - Group Show

Residency, Los Angeles, CA | On view June 16, 2018-August 25, 2018

Residency Art Gallery is extremely pleased to present the inaugural installment of The New Contemporaries. This group exhibition will run from June 16th through August 25th, 2018, with an opening reception that will take place on Saturday, June 16th from 6pm to 10pm. The New Contemporaries, Vol I will feature all-new work from Alex Anderson, Felipe Baeza, Lorenzo Baker, Coleman Collins, Aaron Estrada, Tatyana Fazlalizadeh, Kohshin Finley, texas isaiah, Devin B. Johnson, Kya Lou, Star Montana, Elliot Reed and Vaughn Spann

Throughout history, Black and Latinx human bodies have been subjected to exploitation and experimentation with events such as the Tuskegee experiments, forced sterilization of Latin women during the 60s, slave phrenology experiments and more. In more recent times, Black and Latinx culture is fetishized upon through appropriation within mainstream media. This exhibition will be a survey of how Black and Latinx bodies have evolved outside the space of the aforementioned events to show that we are much more than tools for appropriation and objectivity. Works included in this exhibition will examine ideas of empowerment, acceptance, sexuality, gender identity, culture and community stemming from the artists’ own identities and experiences.

The New Contemporaries project will be a yearly exhibition showcasing new work from emerging artists from around the country. The artists involved are practitioners from varying mediums – including photography, performative works, printmaking, painting and sculpture. Programming surrounding the project will include live performances, community dialogues and artist talks. The New Contemporaries project embodies the core mission of Residency Art Gallery by highlighting artists of color whose bodies of work center around socio-political, gender and community themes. The work shown in The New Contemporaries challenges these artists to recover their personal narratives as people of color existing in today’s society but also creatively reshape history. Residency continues to celebrate these contemporary artists in a space that safe for all genders, races and cultures.

 

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Demolition WoManhood
May
26
to Jul 7

Demolition WoManhood

Commonwealth and Council and Skibum MacArthur, Los Angeles, CA | On view May 26, 2018-July 7, 2018

Commonwealth and Council and Skibum MacArthur are pleased to present Demolition WoManhood. The show revisits the 2013 exhibition Demolition Womanorganized by Commonwealth and Council at the Guggenheim Gallery at Chapman University, which featured “an intergenerational sisterhood of artists whose projects re-envision our shared habitat through inflections of difference.” Demolition WoManhood continues the queering mandate by bringing together artists who question and dismantle dominant systemic power structures of patriarchy, white supremacy, heteronormativism, and imperialism through practices that propose alternative values and histories.

Employing material transformation, conceptual recontextualization, and minoritarian perspectives, Demolition WoManhood deconstructs and reconstructs the myriad social codes we have been conditioned to accept as the status quo. Vanessa Conte, ektor garcia, Young Joon Kwak, Oren Pinhassi, and Christina Quarles reconsider norms and standards regarding gender and sexuality. Kelly Akashi, Olga Koumoundouros, and Candice Lin and Patrick Staff play the roles of hackers and decipherers who experiment with the physical and material conventions of art objecthood to explore issues of political and social import; while Felipe Baeza, Beatriz Cortes and Rafa Esparza, and Suki Seokyeong Kang privilege viewpoints of the non-West, proffering alternative art histories of the East and global South. David Alekhuogie, Nikita Gale, and Kenneth Tam decode the language and aesthetics of industrial design and mass media to critique the values propagated by these capitalist apparatuses.

Kelly Akashi, David Alekhuogie, Felipe Baeza, Vanessa Conte, Beatriz Cortez and Rafa Esparza, Nikita Gale, ektor garcia, Suki Seokyeong Kang, Olga Koumoundouros, Young Joon Kwak, Candice Lin and Patrick Staff, Oren Pinhassi, Christina Quarles, Kenneth Tam

Organized by Danielle Shang

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 No Longer Yours
Apr
14
to May 12

No Longer Yours

The Mistake Room at Anonymous Gallery for Condo, Mexico City, Mexico | On view April 14, 2018-May 12, 2018

Over the last five years, conversations about diversity within a host of cultural spheres in the United States have taken on a new sense of urgency. From film and television to the visual and performing arts, this emboldened public debate has instigated a push towards more equitable representation for historically marginalized people in creative industries. This push has manifested as producers of color create content for major networks, directors and their inclusive casts guide films to box office-shattering success, and museums stage exhibitions of works by artists too often left out of art history. In short, we are living through a moment when increased visibility seems to be proof of progress made. And yet, like similar times past, questions loom about the intentions and consequences of this urge to be seen.

Do the marked bodies that inhabit these pictures and stories also own them? Are they stakeholders and powerbrokers in the structures through which these images and narratives circulate? Do they benefit from the economies their distribution and mediation generate? A stubborn disconnect seems to remain between the heightened visibility afforded by an increase of institutional support and the notable absence of a similar rise in power. In the realm of contemporary art, this draws unsettling parallels to the brief embrace of multiculturalism during the 1980’s and the subsequent backlash that followed it. Conscious of promises previously broken, it seems urgent, and perhaps even necessary, to consider what the outcomes of our current embrace of inclusivity will be.

This exhibition is the first in a series of projects TMR will stage dedicated to expanding a more candid engagement with the practical complexities that accompany our institutional discourses of inclusion and representation. No Longer Yours takes contemporary art’s resurgent interest in the figure as a point of departure to begin to understand the strategies artists are mobilizing to resist the easy consumption of their work in intellectual and institutional spaces that have historically marginalized it. The show, part of the Mexico City edition of Condo, is a selling exhibition. Half of the proceeds of all sales will go directly to participating artists and the other half to TMR to support future projects like this one that aspire to restructure the relationship between institutions and artists so that risk, power, and resources are shared between both more equitably. Inspired by conversations with our collaborators, this iteration of the exhibition is a precursor to an expanded version of the show that will be presented at TMR’s Los Angeles space in Fall 2018.

For the artists included in this exhibition, visibility is highly suspect. Their works resist, evade, and undermine the legible body. Their figuration flees from any form of finality through the continuous accrual of marks, the formal privileging of moments of emergence, and a ceaselessly inventive obstruction of the identifiable. The result is a conscious and varied refusal of being-pictured that denies the social and economic compulsion towards accessibility. Instead, these artists create secret forms of value through a visual language of rejection, obstruction, and elusion that stymies the demand for stable representations of difference, but allows intimate knowledges to flourish.  To a voracious public, they offer estranged and cryptic forms that resist consumption, deliberately reserving their corporeal histories, gestures, and traumas to themselves and reveling in the unknown pleasures of opacity.

Artists in exhibition: Eddie Aparicio, Susu Attar, Felipe Baeza, Aaron D. Estrada, Young Joon Kwak, Ofelia Marquez, Ronny Quevedo, Fay Ray, and Cosmo Whyte. 

No Longer Yours is organized by The Mistake Room and curated by Cesar Garcia, TMR Executive & Artistic Director, Kris Kuramitsu, TMR Deputy Director & Head of Program, and Nicolas Orozco-Valdivia, TMR Assistant Curator. 

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Internalized Borders
Feb
14
to Apr 13

Internalized Borders

Presidents Gallery at John Jay College, New York, NY | On view February 14, 2018, April 13, 2018

Featuring 18 artists working through a range of media, Internalized Borders addresses immigration, identity, detention, and deportation. Taking the 9/11 attacks on the World Trade Center as a pivotal moment for the escalation of attacks on immigrants, this exhibition examines the various ways that language and legal systems create internal and external borders based on fear, the criminalization of identity, the economics of migration, and the construction of otherness.

A border can be a physical wall between territories restricting people from moving freely across it, a social construct articulated through language and belief systems, a psychological state, or a checkpoint for the legal system to determine who is accepted and who is not. Humans define themselves in the context of groups framed by these borders. As borders are internalized they modify who we are with categories such as race, gender, religion, ethnicity, and language. —Ultimately, a stereotyping belief system that creates oppressive categories that manifest as racism, sexism, and classism. Borders subjugate cultural identity and exaggerate our differences, but can also cultivate transient cultures and the sharing of disparate ideas.

While borders are real, they are also permeable—social constructs that require constant re-examination. The artists we have selected explore these ideas and offer a counter discourse. Francisco Donoso‘s in the installation Finding Form mixes the vocabulary of cartography with an abstract terrain, to question the arbitrariness of borders, the search for a sense of place and the psychological displacement experienced by migrants.

Alva Mooses installation Moving Earth/ Moviendo Tierra examines the legal process of relocating landscape transporting a singular Adobe brick from Northern Mexico to the States. Joiri Minaya’s video Siboney investigates ways of hacking the dominant narrative projected onto us through an embodiment of the projection creating a hyper awareness of our assumptions.

Edel Rodriguez’s drawing of a drowned hand entangled with a red line creates a strong visual statement about violence against people of color. Cuban immigrant Tatiana Garmendia’s video Border Crossing the artist lies partially nude and face up, with eyes staring upwards. The motionless body is spotlighted from above as though a surveillance airplane has found her. Garmendia’s animation The Unraveling functions as both a prose poem and a visual journey that tells of her parents’ experiences after the Revolution in Cuba and their migration Journey. Deborah Faye Lawrence’s collage Game of the Occupied States (“Buy and Sell from Coast to Coast”) provides a chilling image of a police state with surveillance towers punctuating a border fence around the whole country.

Ricardo Gomez’s Labyrinth with Wall (Map) uses the tippy labyrinth game overlaid with a map of the Americas and a symbolic representation of the border wall running along the US-Mexico.  Felipe BaezaUntitled (so much darkness, so much brownness), 2016, transforms the map of the United States of America through a somber earthy palette embedding in it a brown figure reminding us of the erasures of native cultures. Similarly, Mauricio Cortes Ortega’s Painting Tio Ghillie is a portrait painting of a Ghillie Suit (type of camouflage clothing designed to resemble the background environment such as foliage, snow or sand) that suggests that the landscape is greater than any singular force, and to question what can be seen versus not, who is there and isn’t.

Shahrzad Changalvaee from Tehran  in her installations As Long as it Casts #25, We Thought it is Obvious #1, and We Thought it Obvious #2, 2018 explore materiality, displacement, language, making and hope. Maria de Los Angeles’s wearable sculptures and installation of drawings bring for the individual focus on the undocumented citizen, the psychological impact of migration, biculturalism, and the ethical questions surrounding undocumented migration. Her imagery is a composite of current events, memories, imagination, myth and biographical truth.  

These are some of the artists engaging in conversations about social justice. Ideas of citizenship, biases in language, criminalization of identity, law, and borders explore the complexity of social interactions among diverse bodies. We believe that this exhibition aligns with the mission of John Jay College of Criminal Justice to explore social justice in its many dimensions and will stimulate the minds of the students, faculty, and visitors alike.

Internalized Borders will Feature works by Felipe Baeza, Ricardo Gomez, Dina BursztynRyan Bonilla, Maria de Los Angeles, Alva Mooses, Mauricio Cortes Ortega, Constanza Alarcon Tennen, Francisco Donoso, Shahrzad Changalvaee, Edel Rodriguez, Tatiana Garmendia, Deborah Faye Lawrence, Joiri Minaya, Jodie Lyn-kee-Chow, and Patricia Cazorla & Nancy Saleme.

 Curated by Maria de Los Angeles and Susan Noyes Platt


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Wild Seed
Feb
2
to Feb 9

Wild Seed

Green Gallery at Yale University School of Art, New Haven, CT

The Yale University School of Art is pleased to present, Wild Seed, an exhibition for the 2018 MFA thesis show.

Group 1 February 2-9, 2018: Felipe Baeza, Ernest Bryant, Kenturah Davis, Daniel Ginsburg, Wyatt Lasky, Kent O’Connor, Jonathan Payne Julia Rooney, Ilana Savdie, Vaughn Spann, Maya Strauss, and Chase Wilson

Group 2 February 16-23, 2018: Camille Altay, Natalie Ball, Lauren Chun, Adam Higgins, Clare Kambhu, Kathryn Kerr, Antonia Kuo, Leslie Martinez, Alexandria Mento, Estefania Puerta, and Emma Webster


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MANIFESTO: A Moderate Proposal
Jan
20
to Mar 29

MANIFESTO: A Moderate Proposal

Pitzer College Art Galleries, Claremont, CA | On view January 20, 2018-March 29, 2018

The people have spoken. They have put it in writing. They have created manifestos. Pitzer College Art Galleries has collected these works and put them on display in MANIFESTO: A Moderate Proposal, an exhibition of the ideas, wishes and demands of scores of citizens with something to say and a need to be heard. It is our current climate of discord that created MANIFESTO: A Moderate Proposal. It was conceived to give these citizens a soapbox and to amplify their voices.

These voices are many. These voices belong to inmates at sun-baked correctional facilities in Southern California and to cloistered scholars at elite colleges. These voices express the ideas of professional writers, self-taught artists and developmentally disabled students. Their broad variety of concerns were harvested by a team of varied volunteers—Andrea Bowers, Olga Koumoundouros, Việt Lê, Ultra Red, Carlin Wing and Jenny Yurshansky—who collected manifestos that are printed on paper, painted on canvas, formed in neon, shot on video and carved in wood. MANIFESTO: A Moderate Proposal is a multitude of opinions hung densely, floor-to-ceiling, in sections that reflect the numerous themes that include immigration, ableism, race, resistance, religion and gentrification.

Curated by Ciara Ennis and Jennifer Vanderpool

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Proxemics
Jan
19
to Feb 24

Proxemics

MASS Gallery, Austin, TX

MASS Gallery is pleased to present, Proxemics, an exhibition featuring six artists who wield the human body as a tool for communication through character creation, distortion, and documentation:  Ben Aqua (Austin, TX), Felipe Baeza (Brooklyn, NY), Xavier Schipani (Austin, TX), Silky Shoemaker (Oakland, CA), riel Sturchio (Austin, TX), and Jaimie Warren (Brooklyn, NY).

Bodies, selves, others, and other selves are presented in unrestricted and unapologetic forms. These figures take up space, and new contexts are laid bare. Representations transcend classic depictions of the human form, investigating perceptions of assumed, controlled, or reclaimed identity. In proximity to each other, the work in Proxemics examines how a body may be critiqued or claimed, presented or perceived.

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Le Male - Two Person Show
Jan
17
to Mar 2

Le Male - Two Person Show

O’Connor Art Gallery at Dominican University, River Forest, IL | On view January 17, 2018-March 2, 2018

Dominican University’s O’Connor Art Gallery presents Le Male, a two-person exhibition featuring Chicago-based artist Dutes Miller and Brooklyn based artist Felipe Baeza. Le Male, the name of the fragrance by Jean Paul Gautier served as the catalyst for this exhibition, shaped like the torso of a Greek sculpture, the explicitly sexualized fragrance bottle suggests the ideal male form. Le Male explores themes of desire, sexuality, and monstrosity through forms that alter and abstract the male body. Baeza’s collage work reconstruct history through the reassembly of imagery, combining images of pre-Colombian artifacts and gay pornographic print media. Dutes Miller’s deformed creature-like sculptures combine fantasy and male sexuality, they personify pleasure, desire, and erotic possibilities. Together, Baeza and Millers’ work present alternative perspectives in which to consider the body, sexuality and desire.


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Kaleidoscope
Jan
11
to Feb 17

Kaleidoscope

Kravets | Wehby, New York, NY | On view January 11, 2018-February 17, 2018

Kravets | Wehby is pleased to announce, Kaleidoscope, an exhibition by current and former Yale School of Art students.

Artist is the exhibition: Felipe Baeza, Natalie Ball, Brandon Coley Cox, Kenturah Davis, Leslie Martinez, Mario Moore, Tameka Norris, Johnathan Payne, Vaughn Spann

Curated by Vaughn Spann

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Reconstruir
Nov
4
2:30 PM14:30

Reconstruir

Cooper Gallery at Cooper Union, New York, NY

Reconstruir is an exhibition and fundraising event was held on November 4, 2017 to support the rebuilding effort in Mexico. Three Cooper Alumni, Alva Mooses, Mauricio Cortes Ortega A’12 and Felipe Baeza A’09 are the organizers of this event, which took place at 41 Cooper Square Gallery. A magnitude 8.2 earthquake struck the southern part of Mexico on 9/7/17; twelve days later another earthquake, magnitude 7.1, shook Mexico City and its surroundings.  All proceeds from the event will be donated to Mexican communities severely impacted by these earthquakes.  They will be donated to: Centro Cultural Bacaanda | Los Carpintruenos  | Museo Comunitario del Valle de Xico

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KINK AND POLITICS
Jul
28
2:30 AM02:30

KINK AND POLITICS

David Nolan Gallery, New York, NY | On view June 22, 2017-July 28, 2017,

David Nolan Gallery is pleased to announce Kink and Politics: The Ties That Bind, an exhibition curated by Wardell Milan. The exhibition explores the ideas of sexual deviance and government legislation –which Milan finds associations between in the work of the ten participating artists.

 According to the curator: “A closer look at the ideas of kink and politics feels seasonable as sexuality and the notion of gender transitions are questioned, as immigration and borders all are disputed, and as the ‘other’ perennially creates safe spaces with the hope of bringing forth the feeling of freedom. It is the consideration of how moral and social conformity and legislative politics serve as a structure to champion as well as to challenge and revoke.”

Curated by Wardell Milan

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JUST UNDER 100: NEW PRINTS 2017/SUMMER
Jun
22
to Sep 16

JUST UNDER 100: NEW PRINTS 2017/SUMMER

International Print Center New York, NY | On view June 22, 2018-September 16, 2018

International Print Center New York (IPCNY) announces the fifty-sixth presentation of its New Prints Program, a biannual, juried open call for prints created in the preceding twelve months titled, Just Under 100. The exhibition was selected by artist Katherine Bradford.

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